Discussion:
California and Taxes
(too old to reply)
Anonymous
2009-04-28 20:20:12 UTC
Permalink
But how Arnold can stimulate the economy while at the same time
raising taxes and slashing spending to close a $35 billion budget
deficit is a source of wonder to many economists.
California will find it cannot force its golden geese to remain in a
high-tax environment, where taxes are confiscatory and welfare handouts
are debilitating to actual workers.

My previous employer, the world's largest chip company, is
contemplating a pullout of corporate headquarters from California.
Already its main production facilities are in Arizona, Oregon, and
Washington, as well as in Ireland, Israel, and the Far East. None of
those states or countries have the tax burden California imposes.

Several of my high net worth friends have already become Nevada
residents, coming to California only for visits (extended visits, but
not enough to let Uncle Grab grab their money). A bunch of others are
saying that if present trends are not dramatically reversed, they won't
be keeping their money in California when they retire.

Meanwhile, more bums and drifters blow into towns and cities all up and
down the coast, more Mexicans arrive and apply for WICC, AFDC, La
Famiglia Handout, hospital visits, drug rehab, etc.

California is at war with white people and Asians who work and save.

--Tim May
David Arnstein
2009-04-28 22:26:04 UTC
Permalink
Hi Tim,

You are posting as
From: Anonymous <***@nymu.eu>

and yet, you sign your post with your first and last name. Is something
mis-configured on your end?

Getting back to the subject at hand, yes, the future looks grim for
California tax payers, who are by definition federal tax payers as well.
Today, when I want to buy something other than food, I have to pay close
to 10% in sales tax. Soon enough, I will be paying for bailouts to the
big banks. The ongoing bailouts of the auto makers are also bank bailouts,
this is complicated. In any case, bailing out banks is expensive. I
think we will find that government has finally discovered a species of
disaster that is more expensive than warfare. What an amazing advance
for human civilization.

But why sit around getting all depressed about it? Unlike most of us,
you are free to pull up stakes and move to a place where the future is
something to look forward to. In my spare time, I am looking for such
a place too. Me, I don't expect to have a real "retirement," but eventually
I won't be able to find a job to save my life. Here are some interesting
places I have found, how about you?
- Sidney, Australia
- Melbourne, Australia
- Caribbean coast, Costa Rica (I don't mind humidity)
- Punta del Este, Uruguay
--
David Arnstein (00)
arnstein+***@pobox.com {{ }}
^^
me
2009-05-08 09:14:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anonymous
But how Arnold can stimulate the economy while at the same time
raising taxes and slashing spending to close a $35 billion budget
deficit is a source of wonder to many economists.
California will find it cannot force its golden geese to remain in a
high-tax environment, where taxes are confiscatory and welfare handouts
are debilitating to actual workers.
My previous employer, the world's largest chip company, is
contemplating a pullout of corporate headquarters from California.
Already its main production facilities are in Arizona, Oregon, and
Washington, as well as in Ireland, Israel, and the Far East. None of
those states or countries have the tax burden California imposes.
Several of my high net worth friends have already become Nevada
residents, coming to California only for visits (extended visits, but
not enough to let Uncle Grab grab their money). A bunch of others are
saying that if present trends are not dramatically reversed, they won't
be keeping their money in California when they retire.
Meanwhile, more bums and drifters blow into towns and cities all up and
down the coast, more Mexicans arrive and apply for WICC, AFDC, La
Famiglia Handout, hospital visits, drug rehab, etc.
California is at war with white people and Asians who work and save.
--Tim May
Another trend worth noting is that about 35-40% per cent of new births
in California are from unmarried females.

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